GENERAL DEFINITION OF THE TECHNIQUE INTEGRATED USE OF MARGINAL AREAS

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GENERAL DEFINITION OF THE TECHNIQUE
Technique: INTEGRATED USE OF MARGINAL AREAS

Definition characters description and diffusion

Forests and other marginal apparently non-productive areas, such as steppes and marshes, provide large quantities of food and water resources, and fodder and fertilizers for agriculture. They are also convenient to live in.

General characters description and diffusion

Calcutta's wetlands case is a good example within this framework. In the moist areas in the west of Calcutta, the traditional fishing and agricultural practices cover approximately 10,000 ha of the territory. Here the world's largest network of urban sewage water re-use takes place. Thousands of peasants convey millions of liters of sewage water from Calcutta towards their land. They consider these waters an advantageous nutrient supply and not as something harmful they should get rid of. 

Advantages and sustainability

Otherwise discarded territories become very useful in the production of humus, food, and water collection in order to support populations of people. 

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TRADITIONAL TECHNIQUE DATA

Technique
INTEGRATED USE OF MARGINAL AREAS
Icon
Cathegory
A - Silviculture, breeding, hunting and harvesting
Identification code
A7
Local applications of the technique
Success stories
Innovative technologies and solutions

RELATED TECHNIQUES

Author:
IPOGEA, www.ipogea.org
Other authors:
Reference:

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