LOCAL APPLICATION OF THE TECHNIQUE INTEGRATED USE OF MARGINAL AREAS 42

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LOCAL APPLICATION OF THE TECHNIQUE
Technique: INTEGRATED USE OF MARGINAL AREAS
Local name: Tail-Lands Planting
Site: Tucson Basin, Arizona, United States of America, North America

Location

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Continent: North America
Country: United States of America
Site: Tucson Basin, Arizona
Coordinates:
Lat: 32.238214
Long: -111.059690

Description of the local variant of the technique

The ancient Hohokam would cultivate crops with low water requirements on marginal land surrounding agricultural fields. Field run-off, especially during heavy rain and flooding events, would provide enough water for these well-adapted plants to thrive without further management. Specifically, Agave and edible weeds such as Amaranth and Goosefoot would be encouraged in these marginal tail-lands to provide a buffer source of nutrients and plant resources. Coordinated planting of Agave creates functional check-dams to direct water runoff into desired areas and allow water to slow enough to permeate into soil.

Survival prospects

Survival prospects are improved by providing a source of nutrients in off-season or in event of crop failure. Agave can be used as an emergency source of carbohydrates. SOURCES: 1) Johnson, Jolene K. Hohokam Ecology: The Ancient Desert People and Their Environment. Washington, D.C.: National Park Service, 1997. Print. 2) Minnis, Paul E. "Agave." New Lives for Ancient and Extinct Crops. Tucson: U of Arizona, 2014. 116-20. Print.

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TRADITIONAL TECHNIQUE DATA

Technique
INTEGRATED USE OF MARGINAL AREAS
Icon
Cathegory
A - Silviculture, breeding, hunting and harvesting
Identification code
A7
Other Local applications of the technique

RELATED TECHNIQUES

Author:
Tynan Hartzell
Other authors:
Reference:

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